The Four Essential Foods For Survival

Friday, July 9th, 2010

Author David W. Franklin

THE FOUR ESSENTIAL SURVIVAL FOODS
THAT WILL KEEP YOU ALIVE

For those readers of TTR who cannot afford the luxury of freeze dried foods, it is my hope the following information will provide a basis for you to be able to purchase and store a sufficient quantity of each of these four basic survival foods to ‘jump start’ your preparation program.
“Man does not live by bread alone.” Derived from Deuteronomy 8: 2-3 (King James Version)
Many here understand the possibilities of dire economic consequences that potentially lay in the future of America. While each of us would like to be able to purchase and store a sufficient variety and quantity of food for that potential future, it is most probably impossible for everyone to be able to afford the robust program others are able to acquire.
Therefore, I offer to those less able, the following four basic survival foods that will keep you alive and functioning in times of scarcity and civil unrest.

YOUR FOUR ESSENTIAL, BASIC SURVIVAL FOODS ARE:
1. Hard Red Winter Wheat
2. Powdered Milk, low fat preferred.
3. Salt
4. Honey

ELEMENTARY NUTRITION and CALORIES
The above four foods provide elementary nutrition and calories to keep the human body functioning.

HARD RED WINTER WHEAT
Hard red winter wheat provides the carbohydrates (calories) and basic B vitamins the human body absolutely must have. Further, sprouting winter wheat will also produce additional B vitamins, folic acid and chlorophyll to supplement one’s diet. Here in Michigan, hard red winter wheat is being harvested as I write this article.

HOW TO STORE WINTER WHEAT INDEFINITELY
Hard Red Winter Wheat must be stored dry, in airtight containers free of oxygen. To remove all traces of moisture, a quantity of desiccant (moisture remover) such as calcium oxide or silica gel should be placed in its own container, inside the airtight container with the wheat. Before sealing the airtight container holding the wheat, an inert gas like Helium can be pumped in to displace the atmospheric oxygen. An alternative to helium and be carbon dioxide in the form of dry ice.
For example, if one uses say, a 55 gallon plastic drum to store winter wheat, a one half pound block of dry ice wrapped in an insulating material and placed in the bottom of the barrel, will evaporate enough volume of CO2 to displace all atmospheric gases, including oxygen. Place the insulated block of dry ice in the bottom of the container and fill with fresh red winter wheat. Then, loosely place the lid on the drum. Immediately after the dry ice has evaporated, seal the lid.
Unfortunately, hard winter wheat is insufficient in protein quality to permit the rebuilding of muscle tissue, which must occur every day. This is where powdered milk comes in. In order for the human body to be able to rebuild muscle tissue, a particular protein must be present in the daily diet, in the amount of 1 to 1.5 grams. This crucial, essential protein is named L-Lysine.

POWDERED MILK & L-LYSINE: THE PROTEIN “BUILDING BLOCK” FOR THE HUMAN BODY
L-Lysine is the limiting amino acid (the essential amino acid found in the smallest quantity in the particular foodstuff) in all cereal grains, but is plentiful in all pulses (legumes). Foods that also contain significant amounts of lysine include:
Red meat (14,200–15,000 ppm), lamb, pork and poultry. In fish, sardines and cod.
Eggs
Buffalo Gourd (10,130–33,000 ppm) in seed
Watercress (1,340–26,800 ppm) in herb.
Soybean (24,290–26,560 ppm) in seed.
Carob, Locust Bean, St.John’s-Bread (26,320 ppm) in seed;
Common Bean (Black Bean, Dwarf Bean, Field Bean, Flageolet Bean, French Bean, Garden Bean, Green Bean, Haricot, Haricot Bean, Haricot Vert, Kidney Bean, Navy Bean, Pop Bean, Popping Bean, Snap Bean, String Bean, Wax Bean) (2,390–25,700 ppm) in sprout seedling;
Ben Nut, Benzolive Tree, Jacinto (Sp.), Moringa (aka Drumstick Tree, Horseradish Tree, Ben Oil Tree), West Indian Ben (5,370–25,165 ppm) in shoot.
Lentil (7,120–23,735 ppm) in sprout seedling.
Asparagus Pea, Winged Bean (aka Goa Bean) (21,360–23,304 ppm) in seed.
Fat Hen (3,540–22,550 ppm) in seed.
White Lupin (19,330–21,585 ppm) in seed.
Black Caraway, Black Cumin, Fennel-Flower, Nutmeg-Flower, Roman Coriander (16,200–20,700 ppm) in seed.
Pea (3,170–14,995 ppm) in seed.
Spinach (1,740–20,664 ppm).
Amaranth, Quinoa
Buckwheat
Mesquite.

HOW TO STORE LOW FAT POWDERED MILK INDEFINITELY
THE ADVANTAGE of POWDERED, LOW FAT MILK as a survival source for essential L-LYSINE is:
Dry, low fat powdered Milk, when stored in an airtight containers kept in a cool, dry location will keep indefinitely.

SALT
No living organism can exist without salt. Salt provides the electrolyte critical to enable blood to carry nutrients and oxygen to cells, and transport waste products to organs of elimination. In fact, salt is crucial for every liquid flow process inside and outside of every cell and every system in the human body.
When there is lack of refrigeration to preserve such foods as fish or meat, salt provides a barrier for protein consuming bacteria. Thus, it acts as an anti-bacterial agent and provides long-term storage of flesh produce without the need for refrigeration.
For personal consumption, salt should contain trace amounts of the element Iodine to prevent endemic goiter; swelling of the thyroid gland. Thus, iodized salt must also be stored. My personal preference is for sea salt mined from ancient underground sea beds.

HOW TO STORE SALT
Salt should be stored in small, airtight containers of suitable size for yearly consumption needs.

RAW HONEY: Nectar of the “gods”
1. Keeps indefinitely in a sealed container.
2. Is anti-bacterial and may be used directly or in poultices to reduce and stop topical infections.
3. Contains trace amounts of valuable nutrients from pollen, as well as Vitamin C which prevents scurvy.
4. Can be used as a beneficial, delightful and flavorful sweetener in baking, beverages and daily meals.
5. Can be fermented to produce ethyl alcohol, which is also a very good anti-bacterial compound.

HOW TO STORE HONEY

In an airtight container filled to the top, honey keeps indefinitely. Left there, it can be safely stored for hundreds, even thousands of years.
If the container is not airtight, honey naturally picks up moisture from the surrounding atmosphere and will in time, begin to ferment.

WHERE TO OBTAIN RAW HONEY
Raw, unfiltered honey is best obtained directly from the beekeeper shortly after being harvested.
After raw honey has been cut from the comb, it is extracted and separated from the wax by using a centrifuge. Extracted, unfiltered raw honey contains all the valuable nutrients and trace elements we need for our survival purposes.
Many honey lovers prefer to store raw comb honey directly in sealed glass containers. Of all raw honey, combed honey contains the maximum nutritional value. And the wax can be used to make candles for emergency lighting!
Raw Honey will begin to crystallize below about 60 degrees Fahrenheit. Crystallized honey in a sealed glass jar may be returned to liquid form by gently heating it in a bath of warm water not exceeding 85F degrees.
VERY IMPORTANT! Heating raw honey higher than about 90 degrees destroys its natural anti-bacterial properties and valuable nutrients. Therefore, pasteurized honey is NOT suitable for our survival purposes.
Perhaps the most important quality of honey is the fact that it contains trace amounts of vitamin C. Vitamin C as you may recall, prevents scurvy. Scurvy was the dreaded scourge of the 17th and 18th century sailing world.
The qualities and benefits of raw, unfiltered natural honey is a very long list indeed. I invite you to read about them at the following site: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honey
And there you have it! The Four Essential Survival Foods you absolutely must have.
Don’t stay home without them!

Kind Regards to All,
Dave Franklin

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50 comments on “The Four Essential Foods For Survival”


  1. Oldmanriver says:

    I would also find a source of fat somewhere. Fats are incredibly important to our health. Without them you will become very ill. You can also eat the comb with the honey in it. I used to raise bees and that was the favorite way for us to eat it. It becomes a kind of spread then. The wax dosnt taste bad at all.


  2. Oldmanriver says:

    Also you can use lambsquarters for salad greens. They in the same family as spiniach and supposed to contain even more nutrients than spinach does. They grow everywhere.

  3. I just added honey to me list of stores, thanks for pointing it out.

    OMR just also put a thought into my head. I think it might be a good idea of picking up some books, with pics, to know what plants are edible, and which are not. I know that Fireweed for instance is edible, as are Dandelions. Some sprouted wheat, some bean sprouts, some weeds from the garden, and maybe some sort of dressing if that has managed to make it through the storage. Might make for a decent salad.


  4. Desertrat says:

    In the FWIW department, tupelo honey does not turn to sugar. I guess it’s available around Tupelo, Mississippi, Elvis’ old home town; and from the small town of Wewahitchka near Panama City, Florida. (Locally, “Weewaw”.)

    And remember: Beer has food value, but food has no beer value.


  5. Steve Foste says:

    David,

    Nice informative artical, basic I like it.

    Rat, Loved that beer quote. Wheat and Beer, Beer Bread without yeast.
    What is the shelf life of canned beer, and still be viable to make the bread.

  6. Some place I have found to get good buys for these items.
    A local feed mill for your wheat. The animal grade feed usually has been through 1 or 2 cleanings. Whereas Human grade has had 3 cleanings. Make sure you get FEED not SEED grain.
    I found an all animal milk replacement at the local farmstore. 10 # for $20.00. Powder milk in the store is about $15-$18.00 for 4 #.
    Lot’s of Sourdough recipes on the web. Wild yeast can be caught and kept going in your “Sourdough Starter”.
    FYI Beer brewers used to be the primary source of yeast before the 20th century.
    The 2 books I would pick up is the Boy Scout Manual and the SAS survival guide Lot’s of good info in both of those books.


  7. Oldmanriver says:

    All,

    There has been an idea that has been ruminating in my head for a while. If things would go south at an inopportune time, say any other time than late winter early spring no one will have a chance to plant any kind of garden or alternative food source. If you have to evacuate you will not be able to do this either. What do you think of planting some sort of emergency food source garden in your evacuation destinations. There’s many plants which you could do this that would grow year after year without much in the way of care. I know asparagus grows in the road ditches without any care. I would think if you planted a patch of potatoes that you never harvest they would come back year after year. Grains wouldnt work this way, but other things could.

  8. Actully I’ve had modify seeds replicate and reseed themselves.
    I never thought I would contradict some one on the basics of prep. That’s all the are basics. It may keep you alive in body. Now thriving is the next step up. Sustaining another step, thriving another step.

    If I told you that in December 2010 the stock market would lose over 2000 points, oil/power prices would skyrocket and that reserve grain supplies are at the lowest point relative to population since WWII. What would you do? All of things are possible except the last about grains, that is real. Look at history folks, the barbarians are at the gate. If we are wrong you have lost nothing, gained a few “primitive skills” and don’t have to buy groceries for a while.
    There is no good time for a “disaster”. Some basic protection is have 6-9 months of food. No mater when a disasters hit that should get you into the next “growing season”. Not that you will harvest just you have a chance to grow. Many farmers have learned hope for the best and expect the worst. OMR I know what you are alluding to, heck you can find asparagus on many ditch banks here in S. Idaho. It needs water to grow. This is high desert country. Agriculture only works with water and dams. What if that water dries up or gets expensive or is simply cut off by Government mandates? Like in the “Central Valley” No water, no agriculture, no jobs. But the elites can feel good about saving the “Delta smelt”.
    I’m a conservationist, not an environmentalist. I want critter around, so I can hunt and fish. I want to protect environments cause I like seafood. I’ll pay for that in products. I don’t have a jet or a mansion. I don’t hypocritically jet off to S.Africa piss and bitch and moan how I was inconvenienced that my jet lost a priority take off time. Then go and give PSA’s about inflating tires or how CFL’s are really good for you.
    I don’t mind the “Rich” being rich. I may get a annoyed at the hypocrisy of most of class. But heck they made their money and I have no want of their wealth. Envious sure, jealous a bit.But they have talents and skills that are valued. I may think folks are wrong to value those skills, but it is their money.
    That reminds me I need to buy a stock of old incandescent bulbs as a barter good.
    I could just imagine our “Founding Fathers” coming back and saying “We fought a war for those freedoms” They would give us a collective slap. Except maybe Franklin, He’d be “I told you so”.

  9. Dave, a really nice article, as I tried to tell you when you sent it to me. Uh, to sound really dumb, I sent it to the wrong Dave! The four foods you name are what the Mormon church chose as the basics. I always wonder what you can do other than make bread and sour dough pancakes…DO pick up several big packages of yeast, too. Thanks for the careful research. I’m a nutrition nut and either didn’t know or had forgotten the importance of Lysine.

  10. Good hints, OMR, particularly about the fats. We don’t call some of them “essential fatty acids” for no reason. The average adult needs 3 tablespoons of mixed arichidonic (from peanuts) and lenoleic and lenolenic, found in soy and safflower oils. In a pinch, you can mix the peanut 1:2 with safflower. I have stocked coconut oil, olive oil, and safflower primarily, and have a bunch of peanut butter under refrigeration. You can clarify butter (melt and pour off the golden liquid, getting rid of the last of the whey, of which there is a great deal more these days.) Indians call this “ghee” and it is available commercially. It lasts a very long time at reasonable room temperatures. I have crisco and manteca, or lard, which will impart a better flavor to french fries.

  11. Good thoughts, Kurt. The edible plants (and one for fungi) books are on my list but not on hand, yet. Remember how far ahead of the power curve I am, though, supposing we aren’t on the run. I’ve got lots of brutally expensive heritage seeds. Do you like Roma tomatoes? Those are our favorites. The ones we can buy come from Mexico and are heirloom type, not hybrids. Set the seeds aside to dry on a bit of paper napkin or towel.

  12. I liked the beer quote, too, but have no idea how long canned beer lasts. I would think a long time. Aren’t we going to make our own?!

  13. Great info, Lynne. SOMEWHERE on line I saw a site that will let you download lots of survival manuals.

  14. Uh…I hope very much never to need a survival manual!

  15. OMR, I knew we kept you around for some reason. GREAT ideas. What haunts me is the thought of it all going down about this time of year, before the harvest is in. Those people don’t understand that most things are available once a year if at ALL in bad times…war, cessation of deliveries, dictatorship…riots…I love the idea of planting things that will pretty much spread and thrive at your hideaway, and also of growing at least salad stuff under lights indoors.


  16. David Franklin says:

    Canned beer will NOT last very long, perhaps 6 months to a year. This is because the alcohol content is too low. For the same reason, wine with alcohol much less than 10% is only good for a year or two and must be consumed within that time frame. Corked wine with alcohol above 12% will keep indefinitely if stored on its side in a cool location away from light.

    Alcohol’s most important quality is its short term anti-bacterial effect. Second is it’s numbing effect on the central nervous system, and tendency to cause one to loose one’s inhibitions, which could be a short time of welcomed stress relief for the tough times that lie ahead.
    Dave

    Cheers

  17. Lynne, you had it right earlier. WE are the rich ones, and not just in friends and knowledge. You are particularly rich because of your attitude, your intelligence, and your gallantry. YOU may call yourself handicapped, but I sure wouldn’t. You’d probably hit me with your crutch! If you have one. I don’t know. You have done so well on prepping, S. Idaho will be safer by far than most places, and you never give up. You’re a source of real inspiration. Thanks. Linda


  18. Oldmanriver says:

    LOL thanks Linda, my father says the same thing lol. Every now and then even a blind sow finds an acorn :)

  19. Brewing is definately one of my projects for this fall. Buying barley as well as wheat so I can try malting my own grains for beer. Simple in theory but I’m sure it will take some practice. If/when I screw up my mom can still use the mash as animal feed or it gets added to the compost pile so I can afford to experiment.
    Saw an brilliant grape press made out of a couple of 5 gallon buckets. I finally have a use for all those barbell weights I never use. :) That reminds me I need to find a recipe for pickled grape leaves

    I really like the SAS manual cause it covers a lot of advance 1st aid. Plus herbs, for medicines and edible wild foods and how to prepare them.
    http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/library/policy/army/fm/
    All are free to download.


  20. Oldmanriver says:

    Lynn

    Once you get the malting process figured out you can start making whiskies and burbons. Its kind of the key to the whole process if you are not using purchased enzymes. Here is a link to the Alcohol Text book. It will tell you everything there is to know about making booze. Its a very useful book with tons of good info. This link is for the 4th edition which is cheaper than the newest one and has everything you need to know. This fellow murtagh was kinda the wise old man of the ethanol industry. Quite a character as well.

    http://www.murtagh.com/textbook-4-CD.html

  21. Dave, thanks for the thought on alky-haul. Morals: drink the low alcohol stuff before it goes bad,add a wine cellar to the root cellar, and learn how to make our own.

  22. Lynne, you are always a source of good inspiration and knowledge. I keep turning over a project and consulted a friend today because I am bound and determined we’re going to come up with a way for you to be able to raise rabbits. Obviously you get around the kitchen well (cooking, making cheese, planning on wine and beer…) Southern Idaho is apparently a good climate for rabbits because what they don’t deal well with is heat. I suppose the difficulty with keeping them in the house is the smell? How about a small exhaust fan? Or a small pet door that leads to a cage outdoors? I know that rabbits can be trained to a litter box, but that doesn’t sound practical for a meat operation. One of the things I learned in Germany is the practicality of shutting off heat and AC in unused rooms (whatever those are!) The rabbits would tolerate and maybe even like cooler temps than we would. We’re an imaginative bunch with wide experience, so will you tell us exactly what the problem is? I can think of several ways to handle collection of “pellets” while seated, and ways to rig a system so they could be shoved to the outdoors for collection/addition to the compost heap, but I am woefully ignorant about how frequently and how copiously rabbits urinate. Think, please, crew. Our Lynne really, really wants rabbits, but her movements are restricted. How about this: do you have a second bathroom? What if you could put the cages over the tub and hook up a hose to one of the wand waterers to use to keep the smell of urine down? I don’t guarantee we can get you raising rabbits by the tens of thousands but surely this many bright, determined people can come up with something workable. Hugs, Linda

  23. That should not be too difficult, seeing as how determined she is in things. What would be needed is info on what space, rooms, sheds, material, etc, are available to use. I’m assuming the house is not a rented one, that would make it pretty difficult. If there were a big long room, that would probably be best. But how many homes have that? Lol.

    The thing that comes to mind first is building a long set of elevated cages that are accessible, with 2 levels underneath. The next level down being a short pull out shelf for catching waste, easy to pull out and dump. The bottom would be a solid metal one that has a hole/funnel built into one end with a trash can setting under it, and a lip around it. The purpose of this is to catch anything that the middle shelf did not, and could easily be swept with a broom of some sort. There would need to be a metal backing plate around the backside and sides to help make sure nothing dropped back there, and the whole frame could be welded together from angle iron, then covered with strong/heavy chicken wire, with openings for doors and feed trays. The thing could be sectioned off into multiple compartments to keep animals apart when applicable.

    Another idea is to make it with a single shelf under it, shaped more like a trough, deep, with one end being over a drain, and the front or back sticking out a bit so water could injected via hose or something. That way would make it easier to clean out the waste by hose, or even allow a system set up along the back sort of like a drip irrigation for farms, but for waste removal.

    Another idea is to get a heavy duty table going, and hit garage sales looking for old cages to just set on top. Cheaper more than likely, but far more work me thinks.

    But ideas could come more easily if we knew what we were working with, space, money, and materials.

  24. Linda, I have bunnies. I’m not sure about when or where the confusion happened. I had an old kennel area with overhead cover and a concrete slab. Still not perfect but it’s a pretty good area. Had to do some wet burlap bags and a box fan yesterday along with a couple of ice bottles. 95 degrees and no wind. But bunnies are ok the temp dropped today. The hardest thing for me is killing them, (Soft hearted). I can butcher with no problems and can do about 3 a day. So I do a couple and come back. I bag up the manure and so far I have given it away on Freecycle. Great for gardens and roses and not “Hot” like other manures.
    Still a work in progress but it’s coming along. Thanks for your concern all and keep the ideas coming.

  25. Kurt as always, money or the lack there of, is always a challenge to overcome. Plus my carpentry skills leave a lot to be desired. But I’m getting on top of the situation. I’ll be getting 3 more cages, for offspring. I seem to learn best by experimentation along with book knowledge. So it’s a work in progress, though getting better all the time.
    I’ve held off on breeding for awhile until I can get more on top of things as far as what I need to do. Opposed to dealing with “What’s happened now?”.
    Linda I think the Pygmy goat idea has merit. I just have to wait awhile until the zoning laws change. I am authorized to have a “medium” sized agricultural animal on my property with just a permit from the city. Bunnies aren’t covered though chickens are restricted somewhat by city codes. Part of the hesitation of getting some bigger critters is that both Mom and I want to be sure we can take care of all their needs and have a backup plans for feeding and upkeep. I may get family members to feed the critters, but milking and doctoring these animals, not so much. Of course if the SHTF all of those things may change.

  26. Kinda figured you would be. You strike me as being determined. Perhaps milking can be done on a bench, ramp, or table? Something to raise them up just enough to where you can get at to what you need to get the job done, but narrow enough to not encourage them to turn their head or butt towards you. Probably could use some sort of railing to help keep them from falling off, but something that can be reached through. As for doctoring, that might be done for the most part on the same type of set up, though occasionally it might need to be able to tilt the animal. A table can usually be tilted though by raising one side with books or jack.

    Yea, kinda funny how SHTF changes a lot of things

  27. kinda stupid in an anal retentive way. (I just know this wall will go down if I hit it correctly) OWWW!!
    Heck if it was easy anyone could do it. It’s a challenge, I seem to remember a bit from God, that said by the sweat of our brow. Well I don’t have to sweat to much. So I figure God is taking it easy on me. I do’t look for miracles. But I’ll take all the minor ones I can get. I’m just not equal to a hard test. God gives me slack.

  28. Lynne, I’d take you as an ally before most on any given day, because of your attitude. You tend to not give in to a predisposition to think it could never happen here, and make an attempt to do what you can. What most people don’t seem to get about God is He seems to be more interested in what’s inside than the physical body it’s wrapped up in. What are the things He wants most from us? Faith and obedience. Those ain’t so easy all the time. Faith usually means giving up normal thought patterns, sometimes in the face of what is thought of as overwhelming evidence. Obedience usually requires some sort of action. The capacity for both seem to be built into you.

    That don’t mean I won’t pick on ya once in a while though. Like the other day and the PMS ribbing. It was lighten the mood by picking on you, or Linda. Linda probably would have shot at me. Hmmmm lesser of too roads of pain…… which is more likely to end in the least for me? Lol

  29. I do a lot of work on God’s stuff and then he turns around and makes stuff happen on my behalf. I don’t think I’m special but stuff always happens. I do the work because God ask it of me and I feel great when I do it. So it’s a win win. I do wish folks would accept homemade canned goods or fresh baked bread. But God can make it happen it just take us a bit of time to catch up. God knows my heart and if I’m screwing up he will let me know what to do to fix it. God is always blessing me, I don’t why he is so easy on me. I must have something to do for him. Then again he may just care about me. That is scary. heck I can’t go all Moses or prophets on god. Hell they did not want to be god touched. I’ll recommend is conman sense stuff.

  30. I thought the PMS thing was brilliant. If that what makes you prep, I love it. Heck I PMS and suffer from bad cramps as well. I would never inflict on anyone with given a choice. I think a TENs device is a good thing to add to your 1st aid kit.

  31. A bit of arrogance here if not pride. I’ll be buying at least 2 bags of milk formula at the local “feed store”. I’ll get one bag to try out and one bag for the critters. If Linda is wrong about it, I’ll tell you why. I don’t think she is wrong and try to give you a recipe on using this milk every day in cooking at the very least. It’s going to be fun to see if it works in cooking, baking, cheeses and yogurts? Can you see all the possibilities? Plus I get to put 1 in the eye of all those Feds.
    I don’t want anyone to break the law. But like my “Drill Sergeant” said “If you ain’t cheating. You ain’t trying.”


  32. jlsim66 says:

    Cmon folks you have been through the ringer. Buy smart not what is predicted. As much as I love the Mercedes series you are an idiot to invest in it. If I told you I have a bond,stock or commodity that would lose 20- 30% of its value after you took ownership? Would you buy it? So why do it with a car. Who the hell are you impressing? I’m doing better with my bunnies and silver than you are doing with your fancy european cars. Whoop to do I saw BMW a cedes as taxis in Germany I ain’t impressed. But hell I was just a US soldier and not a Wall Street guru.


  33. jlsim66 says:

    Please buy the basics stated above as quickly as you can. It will get more costly as we go along. I did not imagine sugar wold double in price per pound in under a year. And food as well I found some great recipes for bread I want to share, and some stuff on whole grains and Popcorn. Please get some basics and give us a chance to teach you. At worst you save money + it may save your life. We have recipes for you and its comfort/real food. Please let us help….


  34. jlsim66 says:

    These young people will die. Nothing I can say or do anything about it. They will be worring about “student loans” and they will have no food to eat or water to drink.
    Well they (the feds) haven’t saved money who would expect them to save water or food? Damn we failed you. Maybe your kids will learn better. To the few that said save for a “Rainyday”. Cause it is getting ready to pour down.
    Well I do hope I get 12-18 months to prep. I’ can just survive deflation or inflation if given some time. I need 12 more months of stupidity to get me through. 2012 I’ll be ready fo anything. I just hope I have that long?
    If not I’ll make the best of it.

  35. If you don’t get these basics you will die. Hell you may die with having them on hand but without them you will die. Stop drinking water for a day or two. Can you set up an outhouse or burn trash. Trust me you will die of filth diseases. Not all bad, less folks to compete against. Start asking questions and looking for answers. Cause FEMA, TSA and the NG aren’t there for you. Ask folks of the Dakotas floods or the eastcoast snow storm or the Nashville floods how much help they got from FEMA?
    Well if you want to sit on your butt and wait for someone to rescue you. You will get what you deserve, and it may be a good time for your genetic material to get out of the gene pool. Keep watching that American idol or whatever reality series that is current. Then convince yourself you aren’t Romans and the barbarians aren’t at the gate.

  36. yeah, I’m bloody noble and I work hard on stuff. But that doesn’t matter. Your family matters, Do you have food? Do you have water? can you bugout or shelter in place. Do you have a plan? Do you have TP? Have you practice buging out? An emergency will not wait around for you to get yourself together. Your kids need you, now what will you do? do you have map? do you have food and water? can you get more food and water? I’ll bet most have insurance on homes and cars, that’s a prudent thing to do. yet do you have a BOB a plan for GOOD. Concerning your life and that of your family you have no plan, no food or water. Well I hope you find FEMA sites, and they have food and water when you get there. Of course they have always runout but maybe you’ll get lucky.
    Then again you could prep with us and not the feds. A few extra cans of stew, tuna and salmon gets you protien, A little flour and lard sugar and yeast gets you bread, Lots of water,salt and sugar is what we recommend. Not a big city survival but a bit smaller town in flyover country. No Browdway lights but bit peace of mind. Plus some hard work.
    You all will last about 6 weeks on the farm. then you will get crazy from a lack of input. No PC’s Iphones or droids. Well God help you, cause Darwin won’t….

  37. I’m not special. I do what needs to be done, cause it needs done. So I’m handicapped so what! It doesn’t mater. If I want to go into a store a bar or a cafe. If I raise holy hell they will find a way to take my money. Sure I’d like some stuff to be a bit less of a challenge. So what I’m sure folks in hell want fans. Just another challenge to overcome. If you want all the bumps in life smothed over and to never have challenge. And to always be told you are Special. This may not be the place for you. Cause you ain’t special!! I’m not special and you sure not. Grab your socks and you will learn stuff, But you still ain’t special just like me.


  38. Oldmanriver says:

    Lynne you are unique not special :)

  39. OMR you are so right. Anyone can do what I have with just a bit of planning. I do get a bit riled up “Cause no one will do it”. We all have those moments, at least I do of why try? Then I read about what you’all are doing. I think I got to keep swinging. Failure is not an option. If we get one thinking, planning and executing it is all worth it. I just can’t dissappoint Linda and ya’ll. I know I go overboard on keeping folks pumped up. But I need you not to give up. I learn to much from you. I need you to keep fighting, I need you to keep giving me ideas. Please don’t give up or be discouraged. I need your help!

  40. I’ll keep swinging and hope I make contact with the ball once and awhile. I like to think I give some folks an idea, But it is up to you to follow through. You may die from a lack of food,water and sanitation. But have a killer home stereo set up. I’m sure many at home worry about your Guitar hero stages you have met. Wow I’m so impressed. and you Farmville folks do you have a real garden? Nice

  41. I hope installed stop! This is among the best blogs Ive ever understand. Youve got some mad skill here, man. I just hope that you really dont lose your form because youre definitely one of the coolest bloggers out at this time there. Please keep it up because internet needs someone just like you spreading the word.

  42. I hope you all see this, I’m a bit worried that no one has posted sence march but I want to say thanks for all the ideas and you have inspired me to prepare for disaster. What is a cheap way to get air-tight storage


  43. Gordon Brown says:

    It has been 10 months since anyone posted to this site/string. I stumbled onto it in an effort to glean the current wisdom on essential items for survival. Virtually all of you who have contributed would be labeled as dooms dayers or radicals. There has been some mention of Mormons and their penchant for preparation. I am not a Mormon, but have lived around enough of them over the years to know their pragmatic approaches (I believe that they teach food storage covers a multiplicity of scenarios)are born of wisdom and general preparation for the unknown. For me, a job loss, relegated me to dip deeply into food reserves. It has been kind of my wife’s and my personal test for stretching to cope with hard times.

    I have a genetic disposition toward hoarding, so a store of food has not been too much of a stretch. May I interject some observations and add some recommendations to the wealth of information provided?

    1) History has repeated itself time and time again. Failure of current infrastructure is not a question of if, it is a question of when. . . Our political leaders have set us up for some hard times and as pointed out by others, we cannot rely on the government to meet our basic needs.
    2) Our progenators (during the depression of the 20s and 30s) were far better equiped to cope with shortages and hardships than we are.
    3) Even if you have the seeds on hand, do you know how to raise a garden? When to plant, how deep to plant the seeds, how far apart to plant the seeds, how often to water, and how much water to use, what natural plants to use so that you do not have to use pesticides, or if you have the pesticides, how to use them so you do not poison yourself. . .?
    4) When the harvest comes on, do you know how to preserve what you have grown? Do you have a supply of seal-a-meal bags, canning bottles, lids and rings, etc.
    (While I could be wrong, I am disposed to believe that the next big round of shortage will be protracted. . . Months upon months; possibly years. . .
    5) Have you discussed scenarios with your families and designated meeting places and time frames to get there in the event of collapse? Most Americans have half-a-tank of gas in their vehicle.
    Will this amount get you out of town if you need to? If not, do you have extra fuel (that you rotate) to get you to your designated meeting point?
    6) As God Fearing folk have you had conversations amongst your loved ones as to how much you are willing to share with those around you who are in need and have not had the wisdom to prepare? In the same vein, have you discussed what you will do if confronted and demands are made for you to give up all that you possess? The proclamation of martial law and the demand by authorities to surrender resources is not far fetched here. Once again, look at history, especially the French Revolution.
    7) So you have a supply of red wheat. . . Are you aware that conversion to bread made from red wheat from that pablum we typically purchase from the grocery store can play havoic with your digestive system? Be prepared for such, or start integrating it into your current diet. (By the way, even if I am totally wrong, and nothing happens to impinge upon our normal life style, the red wheat is much healthier than what you purchase off the shelf of the grocery store.)
    8) Do you have access to a wheat grinder to make flour? May be time for a Retsel Mill from McCammon, Ida. If they still make them. . .
    9) Do you know how to grow yeast? I don’t. . .
    10) Are you mentally prepared to form cooperatives with your neighbors. Have you made an effort to involve them? It does not have to be a Join-Us-To-Combat-Doomsday neighborhood meeting. It could be something as simple as canvasing the neighborhood for neighbors who might be interested in apporaching an owner of a vacant lot to use if for a neighborhood gardening project. Once again, if the collapse does not occur, you will be eating healthier more flavoriful food, and forge some great freindships with neighbors. Sometimes sharing the bounty with some who elected not to join your ranks (Zucunni bread anyone). . . will entice a few to participate.
    11) I heard a story of a Mormon Leader who stood up in a meeting and challenged three or four families to live a period of time (sorry I do not remember that detail of the story) on their food, water, and supplies cache. The families that accepted the challenge were asked to report on the adventure in a subsequent meeting. I can only guess that there were some interesting accounts. . .

    Well, sorry for the long post. I live in Southern Ca. where all we need to induce riots and mayhem is a power outage. I believe folk who live in less populated regions of the country will fare better than those who live in dense populations. My wife and I are making an effort to get to a more sparsely populated area.

    With all of this, the Boy Scout Motto, “Be Prepared,” has considerable wisdom.

  44. To the recent posters on this thread:
    The front page of the blog shows the latest, most active thread discussions. I was wandering through the operational guts, and found a couple of comments pending approval, that I just did (even though I’m not in charge; not sure why this works, but you seemed lucid, rational and disciplined, so I approved your comments to post.
    The problem is that few people look at earlier posts to see if someone has commented on an elderly one. This time I found it, but who’s to say when the next person will do so?
    However, this is easily solved: WRITE YOUR OWN POST! We can bring an old topic up, add new info and such, but your best bet is to contribute something new, under your own (pen) name, and let us see it on the current page!
    And now, back to your regular preconceptions and convictions….
    JtW


  45. cassandra deal says:

    some advice on the rearing of rabbits. breeding box must have open slit @ top & bottom, as to make them think it is a hole. then they will go in and line box with fur. one must keep them off the ground to protect them from fleas etc. one must keep there ears in oil, veg. could work. or they WILL get mites and they WILL die. they attract rodents. their feces must be rinsed before using in garden. to strong. as for urine, ceder chips? sawdust? if it was me and an inside situation i would have my cage perferably all metal with legs. then a metal tray that was bigger than cage. with a sheet underneath tray on floor. then cedar chips or sawdust in pan. then you could lift cage, say weekly? pick up pan, clean – outside- change sheet. if you wanted to keep feces, one could place wider wire on cage floor. then the smaler square wire, spaced between cage bottom and pan on floor.( i had a mccaw, they are MESSY! sheet under enlarged pan on floor worked wonders. rabbits are far less messy.) perhaps something that would conteract the acidity of urine?(im not positive amonia is an acid) do keep rabits from cedar / sawdust . not sure if one or both could be unsafe for bunnies. butcher earlyiest @ 8 wks. no later than 12 wks. older ones that are no longer able to produce young. can be placed in foil with beer and bq sauce. till meat falls off bones – just like pulled pork. past 12 wks. of age meat is tough. cabage, will kill a rabbit. very little lettuce is ok.. pellet and carrots, are the best.
    heres a thought- minks – pelts – barter? curious if pelts will be of value for barter. i think they r 15 a pelt now? for mink pelt.
    really have enjoyed reading this, blog?
    must say it has really been an eye opener. i have had my head, well i have obviously been sitting on my head. so scary to be in my shoes. i have been aware of these important preperations but was simply caught in a job where the gas to get there cost me more than i was making. scrapping funds i was finally able to open my own buisness. opend last week. which also relieved the cost of sitter for my 16 month old twins. met with my mother today to discuss making a list, and what little time we have to prepare, just to be starting now. (hence, why im reading this now. taking notes on what we need.) i look at my babes and cant help but think, we are going to die if dec. is true and, we have less than a month!any advice on jumpstarting are current situation? when you spoke of people, accepting homemade can goods – what does that mean?
    i apologize for not editing the punctuation on this. i cant type – and i have much to do with my time.


  46. velvetvalentine says:

    lynne:some advice on the rearing of rabbits. breeding box must have open slit @ top & bottom, as to make them think it is a hole. then they will go in and line box with fur. one must keep them off the ground to protect them from fleas etc. one must keep there ears in oil, veg. could work. or they WILL get mites and they WILL die. they attract rodents. their feces must be rinsed before using in garden. to strong. as for urine, ceder chips? sawdust? if it was me and an inside situation i would have my cage perferably all metal with legs. then a metal tray that was bigger than cage. with a sheet underneath tray on floor. then cedar chips or sawdust in pan. then you could lift cage, say weekly? pick up pan, clean – outside- change sheet. if you wanted to keep feces, one could place wider wire on cage floor. then the smaler square wire, spaced between cage bottom and pan on floor.( i had a mccaw, they are MESSY! sheet under enlarged pan on floor worked wonders. rabbits are far less messy.) perhaps something that would conteract the acidity of urine?(im not positive amonia is an acid) do keep rabits from cedar / sawdust . not sure if one or both could be unsafe for bunnies. butcher earlyiest @ 8 wks. no later than 12 wks. older ones that are no longer able to produce young. can be placed in foil with beer and bq sauce. till meat falls off bones – just like pulled pork. past 12 wks. of age meat is tough. cabage, will kill a rabbit. very little lettuce is ok.. pellet and carrots, are the best.
    heres a thought- minks – pelts – barter? curious if pelts will be of value for barter. i think they r 15 a pelt now? for mink pelt.
    really have enjoyed reading this, blog?
    must say it has really been an eye opener. i have had my head, well i have obviously been sitting on my head. so scary to be in my shoes. i have been aware of these important preperations but was simply caught in a job where the gas to get there cost me more than i was making. scrapping funds i was finally able to open my own buisness. opend last week. which also relieved the cost of sitter for my 16 month old twins. met with my mother today to discuss making a list, and what little time we have to prepare, just to be starting now. (hence, why im reading this now. taking notes on what we need.) i look at my babes and cant help but think, we are going to die if dec. is true and, we have less than a month!any advice on jumpstarting are current situation? when you spoke of people, accepting homemade can goods – what does that mean?
    i apologize for not editing the punctuation on this. i cant type – and i have much to do with my time.

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